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Help with Historical Abstracts

You will need to be logged in to the UML Library to access some of the material in this guide. If you are logged in to your UML email you are logged in to the library. You may get an additional authentication phone call from Duo. This is routine. 

If prompted, enter your UML email credentials. If you still have trouble, clear the cache on your device. Email not working? Troubleshoot from here.

 

About the Databases

America: History and Life is  an index of literature covering the history and culture of the United States and Canada, from prehistory to the present. Indexing 1,700 journals from 1964 to present; this database is an bibliographic reference tool for students and scholars of U.S. and Canadian history.

The database also includes citations and links to book and media reviews. Includes both English-language journal coverage and an international perspective on topics and events, including abstracts in English of articles published in more than 40 languages.
 

Historical Abstracts covers the history of the world (excluding the United States and Canada) from 1450 to the present, including

✦ world history 
✦ military history 
✦ women's history 
✦ history of education and more. 

This authoritative database provides indexing of more than 2,300 academic historical journals in over 40 languages back to 1955

library homepage with red arrow pointing at databases tab

Find Your Database

Start at the library home page, and click the Databases tab at left. Click the initial letter of the database you are looking for in the A-Z listing, or browse the titles on the page. Click the name of the database you are looking for.

Searching the Library's History Databases

If you cannot access the above video, you can watch it here

Creating an Advanced Search in Ebsco Databases

If you cannot access the above video, you can watch it here

Find it! (Full Text Finder)

When searching the library databases, look for thefull text finder buttonbutton to locate the full-text of an article or request interlibrary loan for items that the Library does not own.

If you cannot access the above video, you can watch it here