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Help with Classical Scores Library

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Find Your Database

Start at the library home page, and click the Databases tab at left. Click the initial letter of the database you are looking for in the A-Z listing, or browse the titles on the page. Click the name of the database you are looking for.

The Classical Scores Library is published by Alexander Street, founded in May 2000, with the goal of publishing large-scale digital collections of exceptional quality in the humanities and social sciences.

Music Online: Classical Scores Library is a series of four volumes with a mission to provide a reliable and authoritative source for scores of the classical canon, as well as a resource for the discovery of lesser-known contemporary works. The collections encompass all major classical musical genres and time periods from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. With full, study, piano, and vocal scores, this comprehensive collection will enhance the study of music history, performance, composition and theory for a variety of scholars.

Search Tips

Please note: if you are used to using Boolean terms- or and not are not operative when searching the Scores library.

Search Tips

Tip 1: Keep searches simple and specific. For example, to find a Washboard band, you only need to enter: washboard.

Tip 2: Try double-checking your spelling before giving up a search.

Tip 3: Word order, case and punctuation are not important in a quick search. For example, Nelson Mandela may be entered: mandela nelson

Tip 4: You can enter more than one term in the quick search box. For instance, if you wish to find items featuring either the piano or harmonica, enter: piano harmonica

Tip 5: When using the Advanced Search interface, try to use the most appropriate term box for your search.

Tip 6: Case and punctuation do not matter in an Advanced Search, but subject and person searches containing multiple words will return better results if entered in the order you would expect to see them. For example, a subject search on civil rights will return better results than rights civil.

Tip 7: After you’ve entered your terms in the Advanced Search form, the result counter at the top of the page will verify that there are results available for your search.

Tip 8: After you’ve run your search, use the facet sidebar to refine your results further.