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PSYC.4743: Trauma in Child Development

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child
Child Portrait by Bessi from Pixabay

Welcome to PSYC. 4743 with Professor Arcus

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in developmental psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Trauma is a relatively common experience of childhood.

Far too many children and youth in the US are witnesses to domestic violence and victims of abuse, neglect, and other violent crimes. Worldwide, millions of children have been disabled, injured, orphaned, or recruited as child soldiers in armed conflicts. When natural disasters strike, children are often among those affected most severely. How do these experiences influence subsequent growth and development? This seminar examines the role of trauma in child development form an ecological perspective with a focus on neurophysiological, affective, and relational systems. 

About this Guide

Not all of the assigned readings are hosted in the guide. For all the reading and assignments check your BlackBoard site.

For the password to the Readings and Films page ask your professor or you can ask the library.

Required Texts

Courtois, C.A. & Ford, J.F. (2013). Treating Complex Traumatic Stress Disorders: Scientific Foundations and Therapeutic Models. NY: Guilford Press.

Van der Kolk, B. (2014). The Body Keeps the Score. NY: Penguin.

On reserve at O'Leary, (go to the circulation desk):

Seigler, R., DeLoache, J., Eisenberg, N., Saffran, J. (2014). How Children Develop (4th Edition). New York: Worth Publishers.

Link to E-textbook:

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