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ESOL 4

Sentences

Sentences

Sentences    

A sentence - 

  • is a group of words expressing one thought.    
  • begins with a CAPITAL letter and ends with a period (.).   
  • must have a subject (noun) and a verb.     
  • has subject (noun) and verb agreement: "I am"; "he is"; "you are".    

At the heart of every English sentence is the Subject-Verb relationship.   

Other elements can be added to a sentence, but they are not required.   

A simple sentence is a sentence with a subject  and a verb.   

A sentence can also have an object   . The object in a sentence is the thing that is acted on by the subject.   

A sentence can also have a prepositional phrase.   

 

Watch and listen to these two videos on Youtube -    

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=64&v=F03w-vOV-xw    

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8lVy2cz30tc    

 

Examples  

Emma

Subject

eats.

Verb

 

 

Subject

Verb

 

 

Emma

Subject

eats

Verb

dinner.

Object

 

Subject

Verb

Object

 

Emma

Subject

eats

Verb

dinner

Object


at 5:00.

Prepositional phrase

 

Subject

Verb

Object

 

Prepositional phrase
 

 

END OF FIRST LESSON   

 


 

SECOND LESSON   

A sentence -  

  • is a group of words expressing one thought.    
  • begins with a capital letter and ends with a period (.).   
  • must have a subject and a verb.     
  • has subject and verb agreement: "I am"; "he is"; "you are".    

Examples -

Sentence

Subject

Verb

Object

Other 

I run

I

run

 

You leave work at 4:45.

You

leave

work

Prepositional phrase: at 4:45

We buy groceries at the supermarket.

We

buy

groceries

Prepositional phrase: at the supermarket

 

Watch and listen to these two videos again on Youtube -   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=64&v=F03w-vOV-xw    

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8lVy2cz30tc    

 

END OF SECOND LESSON    

 


 

THIRD LESSON   

Parts of a sentence    

At the heart of every English sentence is the Subject-Verb relationship.   

Other elements can be added to a sentence, but they are not required.   

There are five basic patterns around which most English sentences are built.   

 

1.) S-V

Subject-Verb   

John sleeps.
Jill is eating.
Jack will speak.

2.) S-V-O

Subject-Verb-Object    

I like noodles.
She loves her job.
He is eating an orange. 

3.) S-V-Adj

Subject-Verb-Adjective    

He is funny.
The workers are busy.
Karen seems happy.

4.) S-V-Adv

Subject-Verb-Adverb    

Jim is here.
Flowers are everywhere.

5.) S-V-N

Subject-Verb-Noun    

She is my friend.
The women are doctors.
Mr. Jones is the teacher.

 

Watch and listen to these two videos again on Youtube -   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=64&v=F03w-vOV-xw    

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8lVy2cz30tc    

END OF THIRD LESSON

 


 

FOURTH LESSON

 

SOMETIMES it is acceptable to use a one-word sentence.
 

One-word sentences in English come in a few different forms:
questions (example: Who?)
commands (example: Stop!)
clear statements (example: Me.)
location words (example: Here.)
names (example: Jesse.)


A lot of words in English can be one-word sentences. It all depends on the context (the words around it).

A complete sentence, even a one-word sentence, needs to have a noun and a verb. In one-word sentences the subject (noun) or the action (verb) of the sentence is implied. That means it is understood in the context of the sentence or the sentences around it. The subject and/or verb do not need to be stated explicitly (written or spoken).

 

Below is a list of some one-word sentences.
Along side some of the one-word sentences in parentheses is something you could say with more words to mean the same thing -
Hi.
Wait. (Please wait for me.)
Stop. (You have to stop.)
Hurry. (We’re late, so we have to hurry.)
Catch. (Catch this ball.)
Here. (Here it is.)
Go! (Please get going now!)
Help! (I need help!)

Eat. (Go ahead and eat your lunch.)

Yes.
OK. or Okay.
No. 
Thanks. (Thank you.)
The wh-question words: Who? What? Where? When? Why? How?

END OF FOURTH LESSON