Min Hyung Cho, Professor, Mathematical Sciences

Min Hyung Cho, Professor, Mathematical Sciences

About me

 Welcome to my homepage. I am an applied and computational mathematician and currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Lowell

I am working on several projects:

  • Parallel fast integral equation solver for 3-D multi-layered media using the Fast Multipole Method (FMM) (Please visit this website to see what is the FMM and who is working on) and treecodes.
  • Periodizing scheme with boundary integral equations for patterned multi-layer dielectric media (Scattering from 1000 layers shown on the right. Click the figure to see the high resolution version).

  • Volume integral equations for Maxwell's equations.

  • Modeling of ion channels using hybrid-solvation model (Poisson-Boltzmann equations).

  • My advisor's (Prof. Wei Cai) book on computational methods is available on Amazon. Click the cover (I drew the graph) to see the table of contents, preface, and reviews 

Expertise

Computational Mathematics/Electromagnetics, Numerical Solution of PDEs, Scientific Computing.

Educational Background 

  • Aug. 2005: Ph.D in Applied Mathematics, Advisor : Prof. Wei Cai
The University of North Carolina at Charlotte
  • Aug. 2004: Masters in Mathematics
The University of North Carolina at Charlotte
  • Feb. 1999
B.S. in Mathematics,
Ajou University, Suwon, Korea
 

Employment

  • Sep., 2015 - present:

Assistant Professor

Department of Mathematical Sciences,

University of Massachusetts Lowell

  • July, 2012 - Aug.  2015:

Instructor in Applied and Computational Mathematics

Department of Mathematics,

Dartmouth College

  • July, 2009 - June, 2012:

Postdoctorate Researcher

Department of Mathematics and Statistics,

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte

  • Mar., 2006 - Mar., 2009:    Full-time Researcher

Quantum Photonic Science Research Center,

Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea

  • Sep., 2005 - Dec., 2005:

Postdoctorate Researcher

Department of Mathematics and Statistics,

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte