African American Literature

Langston Hughes photographed by Gordon Parks

Pictures

Arna Bontemps

Arna Bontemps photographed by Carl Van Vechten. Library of Congress

James Baldwin

Portrait of James Baldwin by Carl Van Vechten. Library of Congress

ER Braithwaite

E.R. Braithwaite, author of To Sir With Love

Zora Neale Hurston

Portrait of Zora Neale Hurston photographed by Carl Van Vechten. Library of Congress

W.E.B. Du Bois

Portrait of W.E.B. Du Bois photographed by Carl Van Vechten. Library of Congress

James Wright

Portrait of James Wright photographed by Carl Van Vechten. Library of Congress

The Harlem Renaissance was the name given to the cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem between the end of World War I and the middle of the 1930s. During this period Harlem was a cultural center, drawing black writers, artists, musicians, photographers, poets, and scholars.

The nucleus of the movement included Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Rudolf Fisher, Wallace Thurman, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Nella Larsen, Arna Bontemps, Countee Cullen, and Zora Neale Hurston. An older generation of writers and intellectuals–James Weldon Johnson, Claude McKay, Alain Locke, and Charles S. Johnson–served as mentors.

 

 

 

 

 

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