Lowell Mill Girl Letters

November 17, 1860

AMERICAN TEXTILE HISTORY MUSEUM 
LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 
OSBORNE LIBRARY

WRITTEN BY SARAH JANE EDDY PAGE1 
TO MARY ELIZABETH MANSON CROCKER2

                      Great Falls3 Nov the 17th [1858-1862]4

Dear Mary

      acording to agreement I now seat myself to pen a few lines to you to let you know how I am prospering I have at last arrived Great Falls and am now in my little chamber surronded by these walls only but my mind is far away from here it is with you I wish that I was near enough to you so that I could run in and see you this evening and have a long chat with you - I arrived here last Wenesday and went to work thursday I like in the Mill first rate but I don't like my boarding place very well there is 19 or 20 in famely I have to go up three flights of stairs to get to my chamber and then sleep alone. I don't like it at all I don't think I shall stay here my life time if I do it will be short.

 When they changed cars for Great Falls I did not understand them and they carried me to North Berwick5 where Charles is to work and I stayed

  1Sarah Jane Eddy Page b: 1830, MA; parents: John T. and Sarah  
     Page; married 1864: Lambert Jackson b: 1828, Manchester, Eng. 
  2Mary Elizabeth Manson b: 1837, MA; parents: David and Jane F.  
    Manson; married 1854: John S. Crocker; residence 1860:  
    Salisbury, MA. 
  3Great Fall, New Hampshire now Somersworth, New Hampshire. 
  4Although there is not a complete date on this letter, it was written  
     between 1858-1862. 
  5North Berwick, Maine. 

all night with my cousin they gave me a ticket so that ride did not cost me anything. I went into the mill to see Charles and I saw the overseer in the weaving room he wanted me to stay there and go to work, but I 
thought as my baggage was all at G. Falls that I would come back here but if I can't get into a private family to board I shall go there now for I am dreadful homesick here I like the place and I like my work but I don't like this little attic.

 The small pox6 is raging in Dover7 I understood that they had stoped all the mills and meetings and schools on acount of it there is 30 or 40 cases of it I do not know of any more to write to night it is most 
ten o clock and I guess I must close my letter by bidding you good night be sure and write as soon as you get this for I shall want to know if you get it give my love to your man8 and all the rest of the folks direct your letter to Great Falls NH when you write tell me Charles has got home.

                       From your affectionate 
                       cousin 
                       Sarah J. Page 

 

[on cover] 
Mrs. Mary E. Crocker 
Salisbury Point, Mass.

  6Smallpox Epidemic in New Hampshire about 1858. 
  7Dover, New Hampshire. 
  8John S. Crocker b: 1831, Salisbury d: 30 Sep 1873,  
    Salisbury, MA; married 1854: Mary Elizabeth Manson.