Lowell Mill Girl Letters

January 25, 1844

AMERICAN TEXTILE HISTORY MUSEUM 
LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 
OSBORNE LIBRARY

WRITTEN BY MARY LUCY TUTTLE1 
TO JAMES SMITH TUTTLE2

                                Lowell3 Jan. 25, 1844

Mr. James

Having just received a letter from father and that I am out of the mill this afternoon I thort it a conveint time to write to you and thort of writing to Hannah this afternoon. Our folks are all well Lually is not very 
well and father said that Major Joseph Hoit and Joseph Combs has died since I came from home and that John Clark courting Irene S. and Joel can’t get a chance to want her I think it is to bad don’t you and they all Send thare love to you and want you to write and lerned that Isaiah4 had made you a visit and I think of makin you a visit Some in to or thre months. I like this place very much indeed and I have got the pleasantes place to work that is in the city and the [----] it is almost out of the city. Mary Smith Sends her love to you and we work on the Tremont5 No.1 and bords on the Suffolk6 on the No.29 we work together and bord together. You wanted me to come up to boston Thanksgiving day but I would not get out we are having Picknicks hear and I went last Friday night and we had a first rate one and thare was one last night 
but I did not go 
thro the goodness of god we are permitted to see this year the new year 1844 which sometimes have thort shold not be but it is through his goodness alone that we see this time. I hope you have not forgut to pray to the god who is the server of thort and [----] of the [----] of the children of men and I hope we both Shall live in the fear of the lord that when our days are numbord on erth that we may be So happy as to be received to reign in his heavenly kingdom whare the inhabiter [----] will not Say that they are Sick and our troubles will they be over and we Shall be happy forever and fore ever more. Dear Brother Shold we ever we be So happy as to enter that place let it be our daley concern let us [----] and 
that that day shall not over take us as Sober a theaf in the night death is ever on our trail. When you rite to Hannah please give my love to her we have some good meetings. Hear Eddie Colde is Sick and I want to now if Edwin B. preaches in Boston now give my love to Aunt C and Uncle L and Ellen and to all the rest that I now in Boston. Thomas Rundlett is at home and John is hear and David 
Thomas gut in a scrape and had to leave this place he courted to girls and was going to be married to one and at the same time was courting another girl and they both found it out and they had a curious time and I can’t tell you no more about it now don’t you tell any one of it and when I write again I will tel you the hol Story. I want you to write as soon as you get this and tel me all the news and tel me if Hannah was up to Boston thanksgiving or not and 
if you are well before I rite home and tel me if you have wrote home tel ant Catherine that I Shan’t disappoint her many times more I will endeaver not to. I don’t now wether I shall have time to rite to Hannah or not to night if not I shall Soon it is now Sun Set and I has gut a grait deal to do we change work and so it was my turn to come out this afternoon. I have a first rate boarding place I shold like to have you come down to Lowell and see me if you will. I have been all over this place [----]father sais he wants to se you and he hopes we all shal meat in heaven and I hope we shold and I hope he will Sign the pledge.

        Your Sister     Mary L. Tuttle 
 

[on cover] 
Mr. James S. Tuttle 
Boston, Mass

 

1Mary Lucy Tuttle b: 9 Aug 1825, Stratham, NH; parents:  
     Thomas Tuttle and Mary Stockbridge; married 1846:  
     Eben M. Tuttle b: 1823, Exeter, NH. 
  2Brother – James Smith Tuttle b: 3 Oct 1823, Stratham, NH d: 1913. 
  3Lowell, Massachusetts. 
  4Brother – Isaiah Wiggin Tuttle b: 24 Aug 1827, Stratham, NH  
     d: 24 Jun 1900, Stratham, NH. 
  5Tremont Mill – cotton mill. 
  6Suffolk Mill – cotton mill - boardinghouse.

March 1, 1846

AMERICAN TEXTILE HISTORY MUSEUM 
LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 
OSBORNE LIBRARY

WRITTEN BY MARY LUCY TUTTLE1  
TO JAMES SMITH TUTTLE2 

  
                        Lowell3 March 1, 1846 
   
Dear Brother it is with degree of pleasure that I sit down to wright a few lines to one who is allmost a stranger ore rather appears so it has been so long since we have seen each other ore written but let [----] it be so longer but let us call to mind in days of our childhood when we youst be happy and play together. but alas they have past and with them our youthfull days some day we shall be old and sink into the tomb but let us [----] are young day prepare to meet that day which is fast approaching. I am now in Lowell to work in the mill but how long I shall stay their I do not now when I left home Grandfather was very sick did not think him to stand it long, he never was so sick before the rest was as well as usual Mother4 was very slim my health is as good as usual except a bad cold which is some better now. I work whare I did before and board on the Tremont5 No. 29. I found all of the folks well but this has been a great change in things since I was hear before. I may stay in Lowell a few months or longer or shorter. I cannot seem to tell just now. I like as well as I did before but have not gut so good a boarding place as I had before how ever I must make it do as long as I stay hear. Which I think will be hard give my love to Uncle’s folks and Miss Post and all of the rest that I now in Boston. I shold be pleased to have you and Isaiah6 make me a visit now I ame in Lowell give my love to Isaiah I should like to see you and have a long talk with you for I have a lot to tel you but it seemes as this I should never see you again. I should think you might spare time to come home once again to see your mother fore it is not likely you will have her to go and see much longer . James 
when I go home I think I shall visit Boston and  Charlestown (C) how soon that that will be I cannot seam to tel just now but further I can tel in a week ore two. I may stay until fall if willing happens, but do not expect to [----] now I want you to write and tel me all of the news tel me when you expect to be married 
I shold think you might just let me now that little thing fore I should like to see the [----] tied if you are willing but [----] boys are sly things [----] they well I must [----] close I cannot see any longer I have written so much to day I have writen to Martha and Eiter and am now writing to you I almost tired of writing should you not think I had all most well I must bid you good evening and retire 
      When far away from all that’s dear 
      thus taken you may see 
      and if you have one thought to spare 
      Brother remember me 
      from your sister 
               
      Mary L. Tuttle 
      Lowell, Mass. 
      Tremont No.29 
my Love to you James 
            Goodbye 
write will you as soon as you get this 
 

[on cover] 
Mr. James L. Tuttle 
Boston, Mass

1Mary Lucy Tuttle b: 9 Aug 1825, Stratham, NH; parents:  
     Thomas Tuttle and Mary Stockbridge; married 1846:  
     Eben M. Tuttle b: 1823, Exeter, NH. 
  2Brother – James Smith Tuttle b: 3 Oct 1823, Stratham, NH d: 1913. 
  3Lowell, Massachusetts. 
  4Brother – Isaiah Wiggin Tuttle b: 24 Aug 1827, Stratham, NH  
     d: 24 Jun 1900, Stratham, NH. 
  5Tremont Mill – cotton mill.

  6Brother – Isaiah Wiggin Tuttle b: 24 Aug 1827, Stratham,  
    NH d: 24 Jun 1900, Stratham, NH.

April 21, 1846

AMERICAN TEXTILE HISTORY MUSEUM 
LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 
OSBORNE LIBRARY

WRITTEN BY MARY LUCY TUTTLE1 
TO JAMES SMITH TUTTLE2

                                   Lowell3 April 21, 1846

My Dear Brother James   I sit down this pleasant morning to address you. I hardly now how to express 
myself to you. I received a letter from you a few weeks since of which I was pleased to except and read with love and pleasure you said you wer settled already well I suppose you are in business but not in the 
state of Mattremony. I have gut I tired of waiting fore you to get marred so long that I have [     ] have gut tired don’t know but which I shall give up ever thinking of ever marring myself I have waited so long for your knot to be tied first well I should think you might give Mr. Pitnam4 and myself an invitation to some 
[----] to Boston at the time you have this knot tied well James I will not write any more nonsence. I have received a letter from home lst week of which they wer all well. They said Thomas5 had goin to Boston you must look after him and keep him stedy fore he is growing yet write whare he has goin to work if with you or who and whare he bords remember me to Isaiah6 and also Thomas and all that I now my home in particular to Miss Post7 and Uncles’ folk my health is good hope youres the same should be pleased to have 
A visit from you this summer and also the outhers write when you are going home should be pleased to have you visit Lowell at the time if convenient I am stedy am not courted yet still an old maid it somehow happens that I ame always in Lowell when you go home I sometimes think it is pland so I should be extremely happy to see you and have a long talk with you. I have lots that I should like to communicate to you if it was convenient I often think of the many happy hours we have spent if in our youthfull days would that they could be again recauld youth is past and written it our youthful minds soon old age will soon appear and we hastening to the tomb soon we shall be no more like thousands around us everyday but let us be prepared to meet death at all times if we meet no more on earth may we meet in heaven whare their will be no more parting 
     You speak of that night cap. I should be pleased if you would burry that in your own bousans and let me 
never let me hear from that again it ant to be griv’d. I tell you I want you to write and tell me all of the news. I think you cannot read this for you said you wanted me to come up and take care of your children well when you get some say half of a dozen you wanted to know if I had got any Pitmans yet well when you must come and see and go down to Exeter and ask him probly he might tel you and you also wanted to now if he was suitable of his intentions think he is of all he has grit you would like him I think he is so good to me often speeks of you how he would like to see you I have so often spook of you to him I hope you will simperthice with me for you was want to be away from your true love in times past there I hardly know what I am writing about I hope you will excuse it and burn it after reading I must close by saing write 
without fail. Please except this token of love and affection from a sister

      Mary L. Tuttle 
      Lowell, Mass. 
      Tremont No.29

 

1Mary Lucy Tuttle b: 9 Aug 1825, Stratham, NH; 
     parents: Thomas Tuttle and Mary Stockbridge;  
     married 1846: Eben M. Pitman b: 1823, Exeter, NH. 
  2Brother – James Smith Tuttle b: 3 Oct 1823,  
     Stratham, NH d: 1913. 
  3Lowell, Massachusetts. 
  4Husband to be – Eben M. Pitman b: 1823, Exeter, NH. 
  5Brother – Thomas Bartlett Tuttle b: 2 Jul 1829,  
     Stratham, NH; married: Darah Elizabeth Leavitt  
      b: Feb 1837, NH. 
  6Brother – Isaiah Wiggin Tuttle b: 24 Aug 1827,  
     Stratham, NH d: 24 Jun 1900, Stratham, NH. 
  7Sister in law to be – Caroline A. Post b: abt 1824,  
     Thomaston, ME d: 10 Feb 1894; married: James  
     Smith Tuttle b: 3 Oct 1823, Stratham, NH d: 1913.

June 7, 1844

AMERICAN TEXTILE HISTORY MUSEUM 
LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 
OSBORNE LIBRARY 
  
WRITTEN BY MARY LUCY TUTTLE1 
TO JAMES SMITH TUTTLE2

   
                                Lowell3 June the 7th 1846 
   
                                My Dear Brother 
I take this first opertunity to acknowledge the recept of your kind letter which was received the 26th and was pleased to hear from you. I [    ] more to hear you were well and also the rest. I also herd from home this week they are all well but wish to hear from Boston well I should think some of you would write home. please give my love to Thomas4 and Isaiah5 tell them they must write and also the rest of the folks particular Miss Post6 or rather the intended Mrs. Tuttle you say now to the test. I say now to the test what I am about to write I wish you to keep bured in your own bosom. But yet if I could see you I could tell you more than I can ever write. since I last wrote you Mr. P has visited Lowell we had a fine time wish you had been hear. I hope you will keep your promis you said if I would tell you when I was to be married you 
would tell me when you should be married. well it is something we feel dipendent about confessing yet to you. I will confess all for the sake of lerning yours James if nothing miraculous transpires to intercept. I shall be married this Fall or perhaps sooner if I return home before 
my health is not very good. I should have left and gom home when Elen was hear but my oversear would not let me. I shall leave the last of August or the first of Sept. if not before. I have told you as near as I no know when I know the day I will then write you. it is pleasant thus to look forward with sweet anticipations to future scenes of happiness to 
this source of happiness which may become ours sometimes we seem to suppose what the world which has been a storm to others will be a calm to us yet experience soon removes the delusion now [----] on earth can give perfect peace even the most peaceful and happy dwelling where love and harmony ever abides 
cannot supply for into then pains [----] [----] and death its entrance death which dissolves the fondest ties and takes away the life that is dearer than our own but no affliction can befall the true Christian under which his Redeemer will give him suitable support and consolation. Well I think you cannot read this 
it is written pore.My pen is pore and ink pail I shall expect an answer as soon as you get this I may go home in a few weeks and I may not give my love to Uncle, Aunt and Ellen. I do not know when I shall visit Boston perhaps this Summer. I hope you will visit [----] after I go home tell Thomas and Isaiah to write home. Mothers7 is worred about Thomas because he has not written home since he left Lowell. I will write now I shall expect an answer to this and lots more. I cannot stop to write more fore it is getting late. I must bid you adieu fore the preasant 

 From your Sister Mary 
 

[on cover] 
Mr. James S. Tuttle 
Boston, Mass 
  

 

 1Mary Lucy Tuttle b: 9 Aug 1825, Stratham, NH; parents:  
     Thomas Tuttle and Mary Stockbridge; married 1846: Eben M.  
     Pitman b: 1823, Exeter, NH. 
  2Brother – James Smith Tuttle b: 3 Oct 1823, Stratham, NH  
     d: 1913. 
  3Lowell, Massachusetts. 
  4Thomas Bartlett Tuttle b: 2 Jul 1829, Stratham, NH; married:  
     Sarah Elizabeth Leavitt b: Feb 1837, NH. 
  5Brother – Isaiah Wiggin Tuttle b: 24 Aug 1827, Stratham,  
     NH d: 24 Jun 1900, Stratham, NH. 
  6Sister-in-law to be – Caroline A. Post b: abt 1824, Thomaston,  
     ME d: 10 Feb 1894; married: James Smith Tuttle b: 3 Oct 1823, 
     Stratham, NH d: 1913.

 7Mother – Mary Stockbridge b: 29 May 1798, Exeter, NH  
    d: 22 Jun 1899, NH; married: Thomas Tuttle b: 25 Nov 1798,  
    Nottingham, NH d: 14 Apr 1893, NH.