Lowell Mill Girl Letters

Amy Galusha, April 3, 1849

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 001

WRITTEN BY AMY MELENDA GALUSHA1 
TO HER BROTHER AARON LELAND GALUSHA2

Lowell3 April 3, 1849

Dear Brother,

      I do not know but you will blame me for not answering youre kind letter sooner but I think you will excuse me when I tell you the reason which is this  I have been very sick with the vere Loyd4 I do not know as you will know what that is so I will tell you  it is the same as the small pox only it does not go quite so hard on account of being evaxionated5 I was at the Hospital one week and I was sick enough I can tell you  my face was swolen so that if you had seen me you would not have known me from Adam but I am getting pretty smart again  I am not sorry that I have had it now it is over for I shall not fear the small pox any more but I had a pretty hard time  I think I shall go to work again next week  I expect my sickness will cost me about 15 dollers time and all which is quite a sum as low as wages are now  you wanted I should write  
about mens wages in the mill mens wages are good but boys wages very low  I do not think it will be best for you to try to work in the mill  you will have to work a good many years before you will be a capable overseer and none but such can get good wages  if you go into the mill now you will have to be very steady and I know that youre disposition will not admit of youre being confined from 5 in the morning till 7 at night in a noisey factory and luging around a great basket of bobbins  you would soon get tired of that fun I will promise you and then you must put up with a great many things which you never had to put up with before  you would probably get scolded sometimes and that you know that you would not bear very patiently which would make it all the worse for you you would soom get weary and discontented and then you would not be  
much better off for what you had done  a boy canot get along so easy in the mill with their work as the girls do with theirs for it is harder to learn it  the girls have nothing to do but tend the work after it is all fixed and set to going  the men have to keep the looms and machinery in order and put in the webs [----] and fix them all in order for weaving before the girls have anything to do with it which makes the mens work more trying and more particular a great deal than the girls when I come home I will tell you all about it more than I can write  I should be very glad to have you here whare I can see you but I know in all reason Lele6 it will not be for your best interest I think the best thing that you can do will be to go into some country town and learn a good trade get into some respectable shop and be steady and industrious and do what you think is perfectly 

  1 Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT. 
  2 Brother – Aaron Leland Galusha b: 14 Sep 1832, VT;  married: Sarah Armstrong. 
  3 Lowell, Massachusetts. 
  4 varioloid 
  5 vaccinated 
  6 Brother - Aaron Leland Galusha b 14 Sep 1832, VT; married: Sarah Armstrong. 

 

right  take youre bible keep it by you where you can get at it handy read a portion of it every day and follow its precepts every day  be considerate in everything  if any one asks you to do a thing stop and think if it is right  you can easely tell whether a thing is right or wrong by stopping to to think  if you think it is wrong tell them at once that it is not right and that you will not do it and let that be the last of it  do not stop to argue the point at all for they may be better skilled in argument then you are and by that I means you may weaken a strong point if you think it is wrong say so and that will be enough  be independent  do not be persuaded by any one however smart or rich or influential to do a wrong action  you have a good mind enough for anybody if you will be guided by that  do not let the evil spirit get the uper hand at any time  if you can—t decide upon any question yourself go to someone that you know to be good for advise [advice]  
do not associate with any whose character is the least doubtful of either sex especialy the oposite Lealand for heavens sake let no fancy get the uper hands of reason  do not be too ardent an admirer of outside apearances if you are attracted by a beautiful form or face stop and consider watch the actions and words with a jealous eye  see if retiring modesty reigns there  see if [torn area] place of all [torn area] of folly and frivalous actions there is anything like common sense to guide the bark or if its frail and delicate form is left pilotless upon the vast ocean of time to be driven by the winds of pride and folly to the gulf of distruction Leland I think of you a great deal and tremble for youre welfare for many a boy has been ruined when young by keeping bad company  but my sheet (is almost full or I might say quite full  you must answer my letter as soon as you receive it  give my love to [JC] and  [----ll] write to them soon  write soon)

 (Write as soon as you receive this I heard from Canada last night Jane Westover come  
down and Mrs Stark) 
                                                         Amy L. Galusha

(dear Lele be kind to pa an ma do not do any thing to greive or hurt their feelings for you do not know how much they feel for youre welfare Lele the world is cold pitiless and miserliy what I have suffered no one knows but I have lived to find a calm a blessed calm in a land of strangers I know that youre feelings are tender like as mine  were and capable of believing the insinuations of heartless wretches who will deceive you and then expose every little word and action and egreavate it to the highest pitch  put no confidence in any one however friendly they may appear until you have thoroughly proved them)

(give my love to [----] enquiring friends  give my love to Aunt I and L and J and all uncle Bens  
folks)

(you must not show this letter to any body except ma or pa  it is written from the fountain of an overflowing and affectionate heart and must not be exposed to the scorn of an unfeeling world)

[on cover] 
Aaron L. Galusha 
West Berkshire, VT

Amy Galusha, December 15, 1850

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 004

WRITTEN BY AMY MELENDA GALUSHA1 
TO HER MOTHER POLLY GALUSHA2

[Lowell]3 Dec 15 1850

Dear Mother

I received youre kind letter and Hellens4 both in the same day and read them with feelings which  
can better be imagined than described 
I was not at all surprised to learn of youre trouble for I had been warned by dreams and dark forebodings that all was not right at home which was the source of my great weariness I expected to hear bad news when with a trembling hand and beating heart I broke the seal But I  
am thankful that it is as well with you as it is  I feared least Fathers long protracted cough had at length worn out his constitution and nature had sank under the oppression of disease and the grave had claimed him as its prey  but when I leaned that it was you that was the sufferer and from that dreadfull disease to which you have so long been subject the currant of my feelings was turned from dispair to sorrow and grief intermingled with thankfullness for youre recovery and now my dear Mother I do entreat you to be careful of youre health  do not work too hard keep Arvilla  with you and have her do all she can for you  do not take cold do not wet youre feet be still and quiet in the house as much as you can  I received youre letter of nov 6 but not till after I had mailed mine of Dec 1st  I went to the office myself and in looking  over the advertised list I found my own name and got my letter it had laid thare nearly a month the reason of my not receiving it through the penny post was that you directed it to Lawrance 196 instead of Tremont  It may seem strange that I do not board on the corporation on which I am working but I have some very warm friends at Mrs Thomas7 that I want to stay with  those with whom I first became acquainted when I came to Lowell

Mrs Peirce is here and sends her love to you  she is one of the kindest old ladies you ever seing she is a mother to me and I do not know how I should get along without her 
 

  1Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT. 
  2Mother – Polly Larabee b: 4 Feb 1797, Weathersfield, VT d: 8 Dec 1874, VT; married 1825: William Galusha  
     b: 1796, VT; occupation: minister. 
  3Lowell, Massachusetts; occupation: mill worker, Lawrence Mills; boards: Mrs. Mary M. Thomas, Tremont  
     Mills, Boardinghouse #19. 
  4Sister – Helen Galusha 
  5Sister – Arvilla Galusha 
  6Lawrence Mills, Boarding house #19  
  7Mrs. Mary M. Thomas b: 1818, VT; occupation: Boardinghouse Keeper; Tremont Mills #19. 

 

We room in the lower back  we have a nice little fire place which keeps us warm as toast we have fire satturday evenings and sunday and other evenings too if we want it

Well I suppose Christmas is close upon us and I hope it will be welcomed with joy as the birth day of our redeemer  you and Father must sing “While Shepherds Watch their flocks by night” and think I am joining you for I shall remember all the good old times that we have had together  I am glad that Father has got reconciled to my staying here for I was afraid he never would be  I shall probably stay another year if I am well  I want you should find out how much it will cost to get an adition built for you but you must get some man to take hold of it for you one that will go ahead and make good calculer  I wish uncle George would do the calculating he is the best one that I can think of if he has not too many cares of his own  for I am confident that Lealand8 will never do anything about it  if he cannot keep himself cloathed he certqinly cannot think of building houses  I will send you one hundred dollars in one year from the first of next month if I have my health but I do not know as you can get much of a building up for that and perhaps people will not trust me for so large a sum in berkshire9  but if you could get a comfortable house next summer should be willing to suffer any privation for the sake of ading to youre comfort

If you can get along for provisions and wood without my help I shall be able to lay up the most of  [torn letter] wages which will amount to something like 9 dollars per month the year round I shall put it in the bank whare it will gain a little acording to the proffit of their money

Tell Hellen that I was very thankful for her letter which was a great consolation to me She wrote about evrything in the naighborh that I wanted to hear about  I should like very much to be with you all this winter but I must be content to stay with my looms awhile longer they are the best friends I have here  no not friends for they are poor unconcious things, but very good company nevertheless

Tell Aunt Milla that I was very much obliged to her for her kind offer of having me come to stay with her this winter but think it best to stay here at present

Give my love and thanks to Aunt Lucy and all the friends that you may see

I expect that John French and Rhoda have gone to Lawrince10 to work  I have not seen them since a fortnite ago to day and they were talking of going then

Give my love to Harding and Jannette and Viola and Aunt Syntha and all I cannot write much about the church for I have left off going to meeting because I cannot go without nice cloths and paying for a seat [torn letter] have had a great many very unhappy feelings since but if God makes the path of duty plain to me I will try to walk in it I never made so great a sacrifice as that in my life  I do not feel happy when I am away from meeting  I am uncomfortable all the time but I hope God will  not impute the sin to my charge for it seems to be the only way that I can do if I had some one to assist it would seem a lighter burden but I am alone and must stand alone in the performance of my duties  I hoped that L11 would be thoughtful enough to do something to help me but that is out of the question

[on cover] 
Rev. William Galusha 
Berkshire, VT 

 

  8Brother – Aaron Leland Galusha b: 14 Sep 1832, VT; married: Sarah Armstrong. 
  9Berkshire, Vermont. 
  10Lawrence, Massachusetts.

 11Brother – Aaron Leland Galusha b: 14 Sep 1832, VT; married: Sarah Armstrong.

Amy Galosh May 9, 1851

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 128

WRITTEN BY AMY MELENDA GALUSHA1 
TO HER PARENTS REV. WILLIAM AND POLLY GALUSHA2

Lowell3 May 9th 1851

Dear Parents

    Jane called to see me last week and brought me a letter from you with which I was very much pleased;  she did not stay but a few minutes with me for they were in a great hurry;  she said you were all well, and that you wanted to have Arvilla4 come down here;  I should like to have arvilla here with me very much, but I am afraid that she would not stand it while she is so young and her health being poor into the bargain, I think that you had better keep her with you a year longer at least, if she could once get through with the task of learning she would do well enough, but that is a very severe trial to a young girl especially in the summer time;  it is so different from any thing she has been acustomed to doing that I think it would be rather hard for her; I think that I shall come home in a year from this spring, and by that time I hope that you will be settled so as not to have to work so hard as you have done,  I want to see you have a good little house to live in and not have to be crowded as you have been,  I have got about over my cold that I had when I wrote to Lele5 and my health is pretty good; there has just been a cry of fire and I have been down to see whare it is;  I hope it will not do much harm  my roommates are all gone to meeting to day and I am alone. I should like to step in and see you how you get along some days; I hope the carrs6 will be so much pleasenter riding in them than in the thrilling old stage.  but I do not know as it is of much use to ever think of going home so long before hand, I should be very glad to come this summer if I could but I supose I cannot, I donot love to write for I cannot think of any things to write about, I had rather work in the mill a week than to write a letter,  you must not blame me for not writing oftener and better for I do as well as I can and that is very bad, I am getting to be rather dull  lately my mind is engrossed with evry kind of a thing but the  right things I wish I could take that pleasure in reading and writing that I did when I was at home, but I cannot and never shall again,  I want that you should write again very soon for I am very anxious about poor Hellen7  I wish she was here with me and had never known any more about Bill Kendall8 than I do  I wish that old mother Thurber had staid in Wisconsin, I wonder if her husband is dead  if he is I am glad of it and I should not care if she was, I wish to mercy that my poor Hellen was away from the nasty stinking stew but it is all in vain to wish. I donot know but you will think that I am getting to have a very bad disposition, but you cannot tell how agravating it is to think of, if H was dead I should feel at rest about her, but she is with such a tribe as she is and no one knows what they will do to her, or how much she will suffer in their hands.  I donot believe that they are possessed of human feelings, they are worse than brutes to my mind  they do not care how much they abuse and trample upon Hellen or how much trouble the cause you. I donot know but my feelings are to much wrought upon but I declare I cannot help thinking that it is so,  I wish I could see you and talk with you if it were only for half and hour, I have been thinking of going to Rhode Island to see cousin Benedicts folks but donot know as it is best, I believe I must go to Boston this summer for I have never been there yet and I have very grate curiosity to see it, but perhaps I shall not; O I want to tell you that the Whigs have lost Mass slick enough  we have a democrat governor and all the rest are democrat or freesoil,  I supose you have heard of the fuss that they have had in Boston about the fugitives, a great many people think that the manufacturing business will have to be given up entirly by the north on acount of the southern market being soo poor the southern traders have all left Boston and gone to New York on acount of the fuss about  slaves;  Mrs Peirce went home three or four weeks ago  her foot was the worst looking sore that ever I saw, she did not dare to stay aney longer, I told her of Sands Sarsaparilla, but she has no faith in patent medicine of aney kind, and would not try it. Mrs Thomas9 and her family are all well I believe. Rhoda has not been very well this winter  she does not work in the mill now  she lives down to Lawrence10 Jane looked so natural I almost imagined myself at home when I saw her, it makes me real home sick to see aney body from the vicinity of home so that I donot care about seeing them unless they can stay long enough to see me and tell me about matter and things. I was sorry that you sent me all the sugar you had for I get along very well  I have enough to eat ane that is good enough for me, I am very sorry that it hurts you to write, for youre writing looks as well as ever it did and I donot see but youre composition is as good as ever, I am very glad to here that you have such good friends,  youre flour was much cheaper that it can be got here I hope that God will take care of you and that is all that I can do for you, I am glad that Fathers health is as good as it is, and hope he will not be any worse off but I fear you will boath work so hard while you are building that you will be sick,  I wish that it was done with; I hope that you will have a good sabath school but do not want that you should join it if it is a going to be an injury to youre health. give my best respects to Maryette Levins and tell her that I should be glad to recieve a letter from her she is a good girl I always knew. give my love to all enquiring friends

                                                                    Amy M Galusha

This letter is written so bad that I am ashamed to send it. 
 

  1Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT. 
  2Parents – William Galusha b: 1796, VT; occupation: minister; married 1825: Polly Larabee 
     b: 4 Feb 1797, Weathersfield, VT d: 8 Dec 1874, VT. 
  3Lowell, Massachusetts; occupation: mill worker 
  4Sister – Arvilla Galusha 
  5Brother – Aaron Leland Galusha b: 14 Sep 1832, VT; married: Sarah Armstrong. 
  6Railroad cars 
  7Sister – Helen Galusha

  8Brother-in-law – William Kendall 
  9Mrs. Mary M. Thomas b: 1818, VT; occupation: Boardinghouse Keeper; Tremont Mills #19. 
  10Lawrence, Massachusetts. 

 

Dear Arvilla

     I read youre letter with pleasure the other day and was glad to here that you have got so well over the meazles; you must be very careful and not take cold, and so must Lele.  poor Lele how is his poor sore toe, I cannot help thinking of him all the time for he has to work so hard,  you must be a good girl and help poor ma all that you can for she is old and all tired out with hard work.  you had better not come to Lowell this summer I guess but stay at home with ma and help her through with building and then come here and work in the mill a part of the time and go to school the other part. but it is about time for me to stop scribbling or I shall have nothing to scribble on

 

Amy Galusha, October 9, 1851

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 127

WRITTEN BY AMY MELENDA GALUSHA1 
TO HER PARENTS REV. WILLIAM AND POLLY GALUSHA2

Lowell3 Oct 9 1851

Dear Parents

     I received your letter and was glad that you were doing so well as you are I hope that you will not freeze to death this winter if you cannot get into the new house try to fix up the old one so that you can live in it comfortably as possible  do not be discouraged for the Lord will take care of you  I wish that you would write how much you owe Erastas Bard and I will try to send you the money fore I suppose if he is sick that his family will need it  I shall send you ten now and will send you then more if it is necesary when I am paid  I am a going to get me one dress and a cloak which will be enough for the winter I have hired a seat in the Methodist Church with Christopher and Viola C. has experianced religeon since he came here and has united with the Worthen Street M E Church on probation  he is very much engaged in religeon  he likes here very much and so does Viola  she says she would give anything if her Father could but hear Mr Colyar preach for he would not know how to contain himself  I do think myself that he is the smartest Methodist preacher that ever I heard preach  why Eldar Meeker could not hold a candle to him  I do not know as I shall hire a seat after this quarter which will continue till the first of January although C and V are very anxious that I should  it is very pleasant wether here this fall  Viola says she is not sorry that she has come and thinks she shall  stay a year very contedly  she was rather homesick at first but I have not heard any more of that since C. came  he is very attentive and sits her up evry Sunday night.  on the whole I think he is a very good little fellow  I begin to like him better than I used to when we went to school together.  Viola has got so that she can run four looms quite decently Mr Cooper says that she gets along remarkbly well  she makes about two dolers per week I never learned a girl with so little trouble as I did her  she is very smart and will make a  first rate weaver  Oh how lonesome I shall be shen she is gone home.  I hope that Arvilla4 will learn as easy as she did  I hope that you will not let Arvilla race around with ... this winter I think it is bad enough for her to go with boys of her own age  I hope that Lele5 will go with her himself  it will look much better than the other way but I must stop and get a light  tell Lele that if he will kill gray squirrils enough to make me a boa I will five him five dollars

[on the side] 
Charles Miner is married

John French and Rhoda called to see us to night  they are well  Rhoda had not heard of Janes wedding she thinks that Jane has done first rate  she was very much displeased to think they tried to sheviree her  Mrs Burgess is going to california and John says he shall go in the spring  I believe that I should rather be in Janes place than Rhodas. I pity her but you must not say a word.  tell Janette when you see her that she ought to write to Rhoda for she feels rather bad.  give my love to H  and L and aunt Fany and Nancy and  aunt Olive and all the folks.  do not let Sall see nor hear from this letter if you can heple it I guess you will laugh when you see how I have written help just as I used to say it what I was a little baby  O how many little things will take place to bring back the memory of the past “Memory thou restless spirit why break my rest.”  I cannot live one hour without thinking of the happy days when I knew no care when the voice of my parents was my only guide and a Mothers bosem was the only recpticle for my childish griefs. I have been more homesick since I  came back this time that I have been before since the first summer that I was in the place but that is almost done with I hope  I do not think that I shall come home again till I come for good and all  I wonder how you stood through the day after I came away  I thought that you would cry after we were gone for all you braved it out better than I did but you was so afraid you should appear like Aunt Irena  
that you did not shed a tear until I was gone but if you got along without all day you did better than I did  Viola and I have laughed a great many times over what pa said when he came down stairs that night after we had such a tremenoeous uprore as bad as ever they had at Ephesus about the godess Diana  I cannot help thinking how ridicolously I was treated in my own Fathers house by some of my relation but never mind them we can live without them and shall probably have to give my best respects to all the friends and 
neighbors who shall enquire for me  Lucina Ganes went from here the next week after we come down  she could not get work to suite her and she went to Springfield  she has writen to us once since she left  she was sewing then and was expecting a chance in the mill soon  it was just as I expected almost a thing imposible to get a place for a new hand in the mill  I was glad that there did not any more girls come with me but Lucina did not blame me or at least she said she did not  I tried all that week to get her a place and Ann Fay tried her best to get her in but did not succeed  but I shall write for Arvilla when I want her tell Lele he must write to me and let me know how he gets along with the house

Amy Galusha

[on the side page 4] 
I shall write my name as plain as I can for if the letter shall go to Washington they will know who to send it back to

[on the side page 1] 
 

  1Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT. 
  2Parents – William Galusha b: 1796, VT; occupation: minister; married 1825: Polly Larabee  
   b: 4 Feb 1797, Weathersfield, VT d: 8 Dec 1874, VT. 
  3Lowell, Massachusetts; occupation: mill worker 
  4Sister – Arvilla Galusha 
  5Brother – Aaron Leland Galusha b: 14 Sep 1832, VT; married: Sarah Armstrong.

 6Sister – Helen Galusha

I guess you will think that I have got this letter full enough and I hope that you will  
fill one as full Amy M. Galusha

Aaron, Polly, Arvilla Galusha

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 166

WRITTEN BY AARON LELAND GALUSHA1  AND POLLY GALUSHA2  AND  
ARVILLA GALUSHA3 
TO AMY MELENDA GALUSHA4



 

[Lowell]5  January 12 1852

Dear sister

            after so long a silence I will try to direct a few lines to you I guess that you will wonder at my writing monday morning but I had not time to write yesterday and but little this morning for I must go to my School  I am teaching over east in the bard district I have a handsome school of about 25. in number  I have eight dollars a month and am to keep three months  I commensed the last day of 51  I like my School well but time moves slow with me  there has been a good many deaths within the circle of ... the particulars of which ... will ... write as I have not .. excuse my imperfect scribaling ... had ... few moments ... thus ... home as soon ... words I have spelt wrong and ... together so if you can ... you will do better than I could if I had time to try good by by  by

            A L Galusha 
            the sweet word good bye 

 

[mother]

Dear Amy

Lele has been gone an hour and I do not wash today for the funeral of aunt Olive is attended at 12 oclock, I wrote a letter to aunt Irene Laura and Jane yesterday after meeting & intended to have written to you but Sall Willis came in and Oliver so you see that I could not write for she has got into a muss with John Thompson our singing Master and she makes it go, it commenced in the meeting house one week yesterday and she followed him to singing school, sounded just like him hectered him blamed him untill he threatened to put her out of the house if he had to do it in piece meals & hang the next 

 1  Brother – Aaron Leland Galusha b: 14 Sep 1832, VT; married: Sarah Armstrong. 
 2 Parents – William Galusha b: 1796, VT; occupation: minister; married 1825: Polly Larabee 
     b: 4 Feb 1797,  Weathersfield, VT d: 8 Dec 1874, VT. 
 3Sister – Arvilla Galusha 
 4Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT. 
 5Lowell, Massachusetts. 

 

morning before breakfast  as you can see her topic was not very edifying to me  pa, went to bed & I was gone to bed before she came for he had a violent head ache and Arvillsat and read all the evening  so you see that I was obliged to put off writing for it was impossible,  she finally drove him out of the singers sect yesterday she went ant took his seat below and that gave her a chance of crowing, but she has a good many supporters which emboldens her to render herself ridiculous  we think ... like the monky’s taking the  
cats claws to ... the fire  they are a setting ... they are ashamed to do ... since the ... for you..., which is the ... your last letter, Viola went ... week ... and we have heard by Rhodas letter that you were well & we fondly hope that is is so but we know your feeble constitution and have evry thing to fear,  the cold weather commenced in no[v] and has continued until the last of dec we thaw two or three day but it has turned and remains cold we have had good sleighing ever since the 15th of no on which day I received a letter from you with a ten in it,  we have done very well for provision  have not had great... while Ira ... us a bushel of corn and a piece of cheeze and said that it be the last for they were a going to move away  Harlow Woodworth has bought his place as sold his acre to Hamilton and his house to Steward Adams,  last wednesday aunt Sally Nelson came here & Samuel Chaffe & wife  the[y] feetched some pork flour and a bushel of corn and grey cloth  for pa a pair of pants & a new coat that was unkle Reubins  I am making pa’s pants and shall have to alter the coat before he can wear it,  Leles school will be out about the middle of march  

 

[sister] 
Dear Sister

            Mother has left a little space for me to fill  I am going to school now  I have been out to Wm  Jane has been very sick  I stayed there 4 weeks and 1 days and ... been to school 5 week  I study Arithmetic Grammer and Geography ... it did not make much difference with me staying ... long for I am almost caught up with my class ... of it ...thinks of going to ... she ... money  she thinks of ... send ... his keeping ... Jack ... my scribling for it is school ...

Galusha 
 

[mother] 
well Arville is short and I was ... project that she has got into her head ... to Lowell & leaving her babe with me but it is a ... in the air  She knows that you have got a [weave] that will last longer than you will and she aspires to attain to your good graces but it is two late  I have not told her what I think for you know that it would not do  she is nervous and her complaint is in the head probably neurology and that will never do to combat the noise of the mill room,  once in four weeks ever since you went away she has been afflicted with the head ache in such a violent manner as to almost render her insane and Wm knows nothing about comforting a nervous person  he bears right on the same as if she was iron  blames her for evry thing thing,  I do not suppose he intends to injure her 

6 Sister – Arvilla Galusha 
 

but it is his way  he has built himself a shop and got it finished  burned a cole pit and got a hundred logs into the mill  he has got into debt and hates to hire in the house to pay any thing and that was the reason of their sending for Arvill  they only asked for her 2 or 3 day the wednesday before our school commenced and kept her 4 weeks and 1 day and now he wont pay her  we would not have had her lost the schooling for a dollar a week but she learns very fast now for she has improved greatly since you went away in body and in mind Helen wants her with her all the time for she loves her and she is afraid that we shall all slight her on Wms account which she cannot bear but Amy you know what chance she  would have to fix her things there  she wore out every thing she had but the lionece dress she did not have that with her and she and I have ben obliged to sit up...and wash in the evening and I do evry way to make her ... to go to school  but her health is quite good so far ... and that she always has in the winter  she ... school for fear she will be sick ... has learnt very well untill ... will not meddle with it ... she is as much engaged... if you write ... console her ... and sometime I think ... to ...  I suppose it is her ... her sick ... for he is ... from men of talent and justice  he will always be Wm Kendall and poor Jane is is wife,  well now I hope I shall have answer ever so soon as you can write telling me that you have got you a satin cloak and 2 or 3 new dresses & finally evry thing to make you comfortable and happy  P L Galusha pa sits here & sits and says I nowe she is well  tell Viola not to to get married utnill she comes home for pa begun the marrying a couple namely Adrian Chaplin to Serebla Butterfield

 

Amy Galusha, October 9, 1853

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 005

WRITTEN BY AMY MELENDA GALUSHA1 
TO HER PARENTS REV. WILLIAM AND POLLY GALUSHA2

Lowell3 Oct 9, 1853

Dear Parents

     I received youre kind lettter yesterday and was very glad to here from you for I had been thinking that you was sick the reason that you did not answer my letter sooner  I hope that you will be carefull and not work too hard and catch cold for it is a very bad time for colds down here I wish that you would not worry any more about Lealy4 for he is just as he is and God made him and he must take care of him  he did not work at his job but two [water stained] three days before he left and went on to the mill  he stayed there about a fortnight and then left and now he has gone to Woodstock NH to chopping [----]  I hope he will be steady now for he has twenty dollars per month and is found  any way I am glad he is away from here for he kept Arvill5 in the street almost all the time and she got so tired out before he went away that she has not worked any for a week she does not earn hardly enough to pay her board but I hope she will do better now he has gone  but I don’t think she will ever be very smart to work  [P]lantina sends her love to you  and so does Sarah Clark  I hope that you will write to me as often as you can but you need not expect any thing from Lealy for he is given over to searve the devil and if he does not get into states prison I shall be glad  I do not think that it is right for us to worry or distress ourselves about anybody  that has no care or thought for their own reputation or character he is twenty one and he must not have any more to do with the disposal of youre property  he had no business with youre [water stained] or the money that I sent to you for I have told you often enough that I could not earn money for him to waste and whatever money I send to you I want you to keepe for youre own use  but Arvill has not paid him for the money that she borrowed to come down here and she shall send it to you if ever she earns enough in the world  for he will do nothing but spend it in buying trinkets for [P]lantina if he has it  but you must not say anything to anybody about what I have written for the least that is said the sooner is is spoke  I love Lealy as well as  
ever I did but he must take care of himself  each tub must stand on its own bottom but if he knew how hard I have to work for evry cent that I have he would be very hard hearted not to try to pay what he has of you  but I don’t know but I am saying too much  I don’t wish to be uncharitable so we will hope for the best 
my own health has been very good this fall  I have not had but one bad cold since I came down here but I cofed6 every day after  I shall [----ce] [water stained] we have got the 11 hour system here  now [water stained] do not have to work so long as we did but we are agoing to have higher speed by and by  so we shall have to work harder [while] we do work,  Arvilla and I are agoing over to John Frenches to night  I supose Rhoda is almost as bad a Jane poor girls I hope they will bouth get along well  Ann and Mary are bouth well and send their respects to you Hellen7 has not written to me yet  you may tell her that I saw Chang and Eng before she did and their wives and five children  indeed I shall send you some more money in about a fortnight I am glad that the post office is changed because it will be more conveniant for you  give my love to all the neighbors especially to Maryett and Lucina and Mr Evans girls  if you see them tell  
them I should be very glad to have them write to me when they can make it conveniant give my love to Mrs Parton and Leafy Stanhope  tell Leafy that I wish she was for she is a steady girl and would company for me  I have been to church [water stained] heard a sermon preached by the Winn pastor of the second baptist ch in this place  the text was be not God is not mocked for what a man soweth that shall he also reap  it was a very different discourse from the one preached by Mr Brown last spring in Berkshire8 from the same text but I must stop writing soon for want of time light and paper  so good by for this time

                                                                   A.M. Galusha

 

 1Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT. 
  2Parents – William Galusha b: 1796, VT; occupation: minister; married 1825: Polly Larabee 
    b: 4 Feb 1797,  Weathersfield, VT d: 8 Dec 1874, VT. 
  3Lowell, Massachusetts; occupation: mill worker 
  4Brother – Aaron Leland Galusha b: 14 Sep 1832, VT; married: Sarah Armstrong. 
  5Sister – Arvilla Galusha

6coughed 
  7Sister – Helen Galusha 
  8Berkshire, Vermont.

Aaron & Amy Galusha, October 11, 1853

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 006

WRITTEN BY AARON LELAND GALUSH1AND AMY MELENDA GALUSHA2 
TO THEIR PARENTS REV. WILLIAM AND POLLY GALUSHA3

[Lowell]4 [Oct] 11th 1853

Dear Parents

I am in Lowell  my helath is good  the girls are well,  people in general well  I shall commence work this afternoon I have got a job in carpinter and joiner work  I get twenty fore dollars a month  bord myself,  I am writing at the girls bording house Nin5 is here sewing she has been unwell, but is better, plantina and arvill6 are in the mill to work like tiyers, arvill has left no. 6 and gone to no, 2 to learn plantina  plantina makes 1,00 per week cleer from board, harveys folks are well  they board on colburn street in the same house with me,  we have goo[d] times the girls came over last knight & we had an old fashion sing  harvey is greasing in the yard the yards are all full now it is impossible to get work in the yard  in my next letter I shal send some money, we arived in lowell monday knight about dust, we got belated when we started from st Albans7  we were ten minutes behind,  when we reached white river junction8 we changed cars we were then behind the time and they run very fast so fast that they cant fire in the friction box we had to stop and leave a car and in getting it off from the track the cars run off and we had quite a time but started agan [again] with out any damage,  mary condon came on to the cars at montpeliur  with her husband  they were going to boston  arvill was at the depot  she spoke to mary at the car window  we took a coach and came to no, 5 direct to no 5 [ld ?] for I don’t know how soon I shall change my boarding place  goodby  ALG

Dear Parents

     Lealy10 has just left me to go for his dinner and I thought that I would fill out his sheet he has been trying to get work ever since he has been here but could not find a place till to day I guess from what he said about it that he has got a pretty good chance  Last thursday we had a great day here  it was called the firemans Jubilee  Arvilla is going to send you a vox11 which will tell the whole story so you will get something from all of us  I shall send you five dollars and L says he shall send five the first that he earns  so you must get you and pa good comfortable clothes and buy you a little stove to put in the front room and hire sombody to chop the wood pile and get you a good smart boy to board and go to school and do chores so as not to let pacetch cold next winter as he did last  and we will put in and work the harder while we can  I was all most sick with swelled ankles before plantina came and I [----aced] around so much to find a  place for her that I got so I could not work and have been out four days and a half  my ankles swell almost as bad as when I first came to Lowell but I guess they will be better now I have had a good rest I am going to work again Monday I hope that thare will not be any more girls come from Berkshire12 for me to find places for this fall  it is possible that Leafy Stanhope might get in as she is an old hand at dressing any way  I hope she will come soon  John and Rhoda French are well and their little girl  tell Aunt F that Rhoda expects a boy soon  write about Jane and all the news when you answer this  Rhoda has moved onto the Boot corp to live at no 25 so she is close by us now and we are glad of it  thare was a man wrote to me from west Berkshire last month about getting our house insured  his name was Wm Brewster and I have neglected saying anything about it till this time  if you and Wm Kindale think it best you mey [may] get it insured I should feel more safe to knew that it was insured  but I must close for want of time and paper  
signed by Amy M Galusha 

 

  1Brother – Aaron Leland Galusha b: 14 Sep 1832, VT; married: Sarah Armstrong. 
  2Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT. 
  3Parents – William Galusha b: 1796, VT; occupation: minister; married 1825: Polly Larabee  
     b: 4 Feb 1797, Weathersfield, VT d: 8 Dec 1874, VT. 
  4Lowell, Massachusetts. 
  5Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT. 
  6Sister – Arvilla Galusha 
  7St. Albans, Vermont. 
  8White River Junction, Vermont. 
  9Montpelier, Vermont. 
  10Brother – Aaron Leland Galusha b: 14 Sep 1832, VT; married: Sarah Armstrong.

  11Vox Populi 
  12Berkshire, Vermont.

Amy Galusha, February 19, 1855

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 003

WRITTEN BY AMY MELENDA GALUSHA1 
TO HER PARENTS REV. WILLIAM AND POLLY GALUSHA2

Lowell3 Feb 19  /55

Dear Parents

     I received youre kind letter last week and was very glad to hear from you I hope that youre health will continue to improve as it is getting towards spring

I did no intend when I wrote you last to write anything to make you feel bad and I hope I did not for I would not for worlds add one drop to a cup of bitterness which I know is allready to full but you must forgive me if I through ignorance  I should cast a shadow of my own sad thoughts over the spotless sheet – my hand would fain cover with beems of joy  I do not know but you think that I cherish hard feelings towards Arvilla4 but if you do you are much mistaken I have never been concious of treating her with the least degree of unkindness in word or manner whenever she has came to me I have received her with as much kindness as I could any body so you may be assured that her declining to visit me is from no such cause as she represents to you but I wish her well in well doing but I do not wish for the prosperity of such conduct as I myself have witnessed in her in Lowell  I have never written to you anything more than what duty to her and you and justice to myself have compelled me to do respecting what transpired while she was here but one thing I will tell you which I know to be a fact and that is that she left Lowell in July whare she went I know not but she was not in the city for she was searched for high and low evry nook and corner but it appears she was not found  but if she will settle down and be good now she shall have my best wishes and most fervent prayer for her welfare  give my love to Hellen,and Lealand,6 tell them that I remember them although I do not write to them as much as I should be glad to  if H goes to Wis,n7 in the spring I do not know as it will be best for me to try to see her before she goes for it will be so hard to part it kills me to think of it,  I have never recovered from the parting with you when I left you, with christopher the last time I was at home  I never think of it but the tears rush unbiden to my eyes and my mothers pale face rises before me as she stood enveloped in the dim misty drapery of the night and watche to catch the last glimps of the wagon as  it rolled away in the distance bearing away her her hearts best treasure but I am getting altogether to sentimental for my proffession an so I leave the subject  I have been to meeting today and heard our Fairfax student Mr Wigen  he was a poor boy and was brought up in our sabbath school and our ch are educating him  his text was I Timothy I, II “the glorious gospel of the blessed God,”  it was a very good sermon indeed  the speaker was a little embarrased and no wonder he was for Mr Eddy was sitting in the pulpit behind him and all the old deacons and sage members of the church were looking up with steadfast countanences to hear what the boy would say but he soon got fairly into the spirit of his subject and handled it so masterly that when he closed you could see a good degree of satisfaction unanimously writen upon the countanences of the heares  give my love to Christopher and Viola  tell them I want to see them very much  my health is quite good now my cough has subsided and I feel the influence of returning spring upon my physical facultyes  I have got some money for you and if you need it I hope that you will let me know  do not suffer for anything  I want to lay up enough to finish of the house if I can before I come home

                                                                     Amy

(I meant to write on a bigger sheet than this but made a mistake but I do not know but I have [----] enough unless its better)

                                                                      Amy

  1Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT. 
  2Parents – William Galusha b: 1796, VT; occupation: minister; married 1825: Polly Larabee b: 4 Feb 1797, Weathersfield, VT d: 8 Dec 1874, VT. 
  3Lowell, Massachusetts; occupation: mill worker. 
  4Sister – Arvilla Galusha 
  5Sister – Helen Galusha 
  6Brother – Aaron Leland Galusha b: 14 Sep 1832, VT; married: Sarah Armstrong. 
  7Wisconsin

Polly & Aaron Galusha

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 164

WRITTEN BY POLLY GALUSHA1AND AARON LELAND GALUSHA2 
TO HER DAUGHTER AND HIS SISTER AMY MELENDA GALUSHA3



 

Berkshire, VT  Feb 17 1856

Dear Amy

after Christian Salutation & friendly greeting I would inform you of our family affairs well my health has good for the most part of this tremendous cold and stormy winter I have shoveled snow a great deal  the snow is rising 5  feet thick and keeps increasing I have not laid down on a bed but once in five weeks  I slept on a lounge nights and took care of father  he is very troublesome nights  fancys himself  caried off into swamps and chasms and flying over treetops and huricanes and screams and hollors for help  and I  have thus far taken all the care of him and have workd evry day and have been enabled to provide for him and me and Lele4 when he is at home  provisions are so tight that I cannot keep a boy and last week I lookd for you all the week  the reason why I did not write  but I shall not look for you again untill weather is more mild the cold hangs in intensely I hope you did not start last week  what made me look for you I dreamd about you 3 nights which is a thing I have not done in a year  but I am glad that god let me see  you in my sleep if I am never to behold your face again when awake in reality  I keep your dogueratype5 on one of my sacred the Widow Burleson was married to Horace Bigalow about 4 weeks ago and has had the painful duty to bury that good Sary Ann one week ago to day  Silas Nobles buried a child last week I do not know which one  Mary Ann Chet is very sick  Mary Ann Sarah and babe have been very sick 7 or 8 weeks  unkle Ben is truly afflicted  he fetchd us a bushel of meal and it is good  aunt Mille has been quite sick but I heard yesterday that she was a little better  John Thompson is very unwell  been sick a week  his complaint is in his head I hired my heifer wintered and she is agoing to have a calf next summer  the old cow look  very well  the hay is rather poor but we hope we have enough of it  I am rather unwell now with a cold lame back &c, but hope I shall not be dow sick  the winter is so tough that I have worried about you a great deal  but do be carful of your health as you can and pray much for me and pa  we do not pray so much as we ought to our selves but our 

 1 Parents – William Galusha b: 1796, VT; occupation: minister; married 1825: Polly Larabee 
      b: 4 Feb 1797,  Weathersfield, VT d: 8 Dec 1874, VT. 
 2 Brother – Aaron Leland Galusha b: 14 Sep 1832, VT; married: Sarah Armstrong. 
 3 Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT. 
 4 Brother – Aaron Leland Galusha b: 14 Sep 1832, VT; married: Sarah Armstrong. 
 5 daguerreotype 

 

whole trust is in god the rock of ages for his mercy endureth forever  his truth is firm his  
promises never fail 

Well Nin,  Mother says I must write to you but what to say  I dont know any thing further than that I am well and that my school will close in a fortnight from last night I wrote to Jane a week ago and mother has finished it to day  we have defered writing to you for we have expected you at home every day for three weeks  there was a young collegiate from Fairfax preached here last sunday and in the eavening he delivered an exhortation to the young People here and we give him a small collection we have a very tough winter and I suppose you are not entirely exempt from it but we shall expect you home as soon as the wether and your circumstances will admit  it is getting dark and you must excuse my short epistle; Amy except [accept] my love as usual 
 

                                                                         Lealand 
 

we have had no preaching to day but Leland and Albert have gone to prayer meeting to night but it storms so that I should think there would not be many people  but I wish this place was in Lowell or that you could be here  it seems hard that I have raised so many children and cannot see one of them this winter  I recd a letter from Arvilla6 2 weeks ago she said they were well and talkd of going to Bristol and I should not write until I heard from them again  give my love to any body that you love ... Miss Warner and Mrs Thomas or any one else that you love  when you write tell me if you know anything about John Frenchs folks how they get along  for aunt fanny wont say much about them to any one and she says that she dont hear from them very often

Aola Hall came from Nashua7 a few weeks ago will return in March and Thirza will go back with her  Thirza is now in Richford to work in a tavern

                      Be this a Valentine to you 
                      That truth and love be found anew 
                      In breast so generous just and kind 
                      And peace to tranquilize the mind 
                      In every trial find relief 
                      The love of Christ assuage thy grief 
                      When you in ... feel the rod 
                      Chastized and humbled by thy god 
                      ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 
                      From parents kindred friends most dear 
                      Your lot is cast from year to year 
                      yet mercy mingling with the woes 
                      Makes light the stripes our quilt foregoes 
                      ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 
                      But firmly trust Gods promised word

 6 Sister – Arvilla Galusha 
 7 Nashua, New Hampshire. 

 

                      The we in flesh shall see the Lord 
                      When flesh & heart shall fail on earth 
                      We’ll claim the promise by our birth 
                      ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 
                      And sing redemtion by his blood 
                      When we in flesh behold our god 
                      A few more sighs and griefs are thine 
                      E’er you with Christ in glory shine

                                            Polly L. Galusha

When I write to you my thoughts crowd in so fast that I do not know what to write first I hope you will answer this as soon as you can

[on the side] 
this is from your ever affectionate Mother and best friend in this world  I am sorey the Lele was so barren when writing to you

 

 

Polly Galusha, February 1852

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 200

WRITTEN BY POLLY GALUSHA1 
TO HER PARENTS REV. WILLIAM AND POLLY GALUSHA2

[Lowell]3 February 1? 1859

Dear Parents,

As Plantina is going home I thought I would write a few lines to let you know that I am alive and well and hope you are the same though I fear that you are not for I have not received any answer to the letter that I wrote to you two or three weeks ago and I have written to Leland4 but have received no answer  I hope that if you are sick that you will let me know it for I have been quite anxious about you since I last heard from you.

I wrote to Aunt Melinda last week but do not know whether I directed right and I directed to Saybrook Ashtabula county I told her that I was a going to see her next fall and I think I shall for it is too cold for me in new England winters I can work at dressmaking or something thare or I can go to Fitchburg and work in the mill if I want to but perhaps you will think that I am building air castles but I must do something besides  
work in the mill here in cold weather I did not think that Plantina would go home so soon but I am glad she is going for her sake and hope that she will never want to come back again Leafy sends her love to you and all enquiring friends I have been to meeting today and Leafy went with me   we saw two young ladies baptised  we have a baptism in our Church every month  thare is a constant revival in our church now and  
has been for some time.

I hope that you will pray for me and for the advancement of Christs kingdom for sinners are enquiring the way to the cross more than ever  for my part I can safely say that I never enjoyed myself so well before as I have done this winter I have had joy and peace in the midst of tribulations I never knew the full enjoyment of the believer until I was enabled to say thy will be done and to give up all earthly hopes and expectations and place my heart fully on the things above I have been afraid sometimes that my enjoyment would not always  last but it is my most earnest prayer to God that he would keep me from again falling into the cold and lukewarm state which I have been in most of the time since I came to Lowell   I want that you should pray for me that the Lord will continue to bless me with the light of his love and O my dear parents do help me to pray

  1Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT. 
  2Parents – William Galusha b: 1796, VT; occupation: minister; married 1825: Polly Larabee  
     b: 4 Feb 1797, Weathersfield, VT d: 8 Dec 1874, VT. 
  3Lowell, Massachusetts; occupation: mill worker. 
  4Brother – Leland Aaron Galusha

for our dear Lealand that he may become a bright and shining light to those with whom he is called to associate for he has talents enough if he improves them  I hope the Lord will have mercy on him and bless him for he is not a bad boy if he would only try to get rid of bad influences  he is in my mind constantly   he is my only Brother and oh how much good he might do if he would turn and be on the Lords side pray for him and pray for me for you are more used to praying than I am and perhaps the Lord will be entreated of us for our dear Lealand  but it is getting to be late and I must close my letter for to night write to me as soon as you can this from youre

                                                                   Amy 
 

Amy Galusha, April 22, 1859

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 159

WRITTEN BY AMY MELENDA GALUSHA1 
TO HER MOTHER POLLY GALUSHA2

[Lowell]April 22 1859

Dear Mother

     I supose that you feel anxious to hear how I got along yesterday and how I feel to day well I feel pretty smart to-day but I had a hard time riding so far  I left Cristophers about five and rode to St Albans4 without anything to eat but you better believe a cup of coffee was good when I got thare  uncle Frank gave me some pepermint before I left in the morning which was a great advantage to me  well I got here abut nine oclock and was very tired – the times are not much better here than when I left  it is all a humbug about  
raising the pay and the old hands are all mad becuase they have been so decieved and say they wont stay if they do not raise the pay as they said they would. I guess but  I shall go in a tailor shop to work but dont know certain  well the people are all well and thare is more of them left than I expected to find

Maple sugar is selling at ten cts. per pound here and goes hard at that  I have not sold Aunt M ... yet but shall not till I can look around and see what I can do  well I have not been homesick yet but guess I shall when I come to go in the mill  I am going to prayer meeting to night  It cost me just 8 dollers to come and I had two left to fix up a little the folks all say that my bonnet is good enough to ware this summer and I think I shall ware it and not mind about the fassion  sometimes I wish I had not come but perhaps it will be for the best  well I guess I will not write much more for I dont know what to say

well if you are sick be sure and let me know for I shall not stay here any longer than I am obliged to if you are sick  well I am so sleepy that I cant keep my eyes open to write

 I am at 109 prince street boarding with Miss Clough5 so you must direct youre letters thare  well I guess Ill stop for I cant write hardly a word without making a mistake good by for now 
 

  1Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT. 
  2Parents – William Galusha b: 1796, VT; occupation: minister; married 1825: Polly Larabee b: 4 Feb 1797,  
    Weathersfield, VT d: 8 Dec 1874, VT. 
  3Lowell, Massachusetts; occupation: mill worker; boards: Prince Street #109. 
  4St. Albans, Vermont. 
  5Maria Clough b: 1828, England; occupation: mill worker; boards: Prince Street #109. 

 

                                                                Amy

[on cover] 
Polly Galusha 
Berkshire, VT

Amy Galusha, November 11, 1859

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 008

WRITTEN BY AMY MELENDA GALUSHA1 
ATO HER SISTER ARVILLA GALUSHA ORCUTTAND MOTHER POLLY  
GALUSHA3

[Lowell]4 Nov 11 1859

Dear Sister

I beg pardon for neglecting you so long but I have no time for anything but I will not fill my small sheet with apologies but try to do better in the future  I send you all the best patterns I can find the open sleave I do not think you will like for winter but evening dresses are made so very much here  they trim with velvet and moire antique mostly the waists are slim and have no bodice the double skirt is worn very much this fall and pattern skirts all the rage bonnets are mostly with red ribbon [trime] bound with some other color with a bow on one side near the top and feathers or flowers on the other  rosettos are worn on the hair now more than any thing else these are generly made of black-velvet and red satin ribon altho many wear black and blue

I am sorry that you moved up the hill I don’t see what made you when you know that I came here on purpose to let you have the house thare to live in  I knew when you talked of going thare that you would not like the job of bringing water so far but I hope that you wont be sick  give my love to George and all the friends

                                                             A.M. Galusha

Vill I have been ... and got you some trimming  ... pink it is ... than velvet

Dear Mother

     I will now write a few lines to you and then close I am very well now  my cold did not last but a day or two and I got better and have not had any more I am getting along first rate with my music I am learning very fast now  I hope that in a year I shall be able to play with ease and [pleasure ?]  I hope that you will not work too hard  do not try to sew so much I am afraid that you will not get along any better than you would to take life a little easier do try to get along without working so hard  but when L5 is gone you will not have him to look after give my love 

 1Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT. 
  2Sister – Arvilla Galusha 
  3Mother – Polly Larabee b: 4 Feb 1797, Weathersfield, VT d: 8 Dec 1874, VT; married 1825:  
     William Galusha b: 1796, VT; occupation: minister. 
  4Lowell, Massachusetts. 
  5Brother – Leland Aaron Galusha 

 

to Maryett and Sarah Armstrong and tell my friends I am sorry that youre meetings are running down so  I was afraid that would be the case as soon as the men [wore off ----] the meeting house you ought to see our meeting house  as big as four of youres and filled to over flowing evry sabbath chris Clough6 has gone home to be gone till after Thanksgiving and I am alone now much of the time  excuse the poor writing for I am in such a hurry that I don’t even know what I am about

                                                                   A. M. Galusha

[on cover] 
Arvilla C. Orcutt 
Berkshire, VT

  6Maria Clough b: 1828, England; occupation: mill worker; boards: Merrimack Mills #100.

Arvilla Galusha, October 1853

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 002

WRITTEN BY ARVILLA GALUSHA1 
TO HER MOTHER POLLY GALUSHA2

[Lowell]3 Oct ? 1853

Dear Mother

     having at last concluded to write a few lines to let you know where I am and what I am doing I am to work in a harness shop which is very easy indeed   I have a very good boarding place They seem to be very good folks they atend family prayers every morning which makes me think of home   I should not left the mill but there was a girle here and she said she would get me a chance in the shop and I spike to Amy4 about it but she did not say much about it and finley I left on my own hook and then she declaired right up and down that I should not go one step and you know that I wont be drove by any one so I went and have  
not seen her since 
[----] so you must excuse me for now

                                               from your daughter Arvilla 
                                               direct your letters to No 1 Chestnut street

                                               that whle the lamp holds on to burn the --tist

[on cover] 
Polly Galusha 
Berkshire, VT 

 

  1Avrilla Galusha 
  2Mother – Polly Larabee b: 4 Feb 1797, Weathersfield, VT d: 8 Dec 1874, VT; married 1825:  
    William Galusha b: 1796, VT; occupation: minister. 
  3Lowell, Massachusetts. 
  4Sister – Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT.

Arvilla Galusha, June 27, 1853

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 162

WRITTEN BY ARVILLA GALUSHA1 
TO HER MOTHER POLLY GALUSHA2

[Lowell]3 June 27 1857

Dear Mother

     I wrote you a letter last sunday but I did not cary it to the ofice so now I will write an other how do you do and how are you getting along  I hope that you will not kill yourself at work in the garden this summer but I expect that you will for you are always so ambitious  I think of you a great deal and long to be with you but I must get a living by my labor and so I must submit to a seperation from my best friends but it is only for a season and then we shall meet again I hope whare we shall not be seperated any more from one another society  I wish I could be at home this summer but cannot for I must work well I dont know what to write about unless I tell you about our new minister he was installed a week ago last wednesday evening  we have a minister again he is full as smart as Mr Eddy and I presume will be liked as well when they get used to his ways our meetings are very fully attended as much as I knowne them to be  my health is very good this summer  I have worked quite steady so far through the summer the forainers4 are so much in the ascendency here that the yankees are afraid to celebrate least they should rise and burn the city so you can see what we are all coming to  I wish that you could have been here last sunday  it was high mass day with them and the bishop was here and oh such a turn out  the street was full and crowded from five in the morning till half past ten with zealous catholicks going to mass and confirmation  it has been stated by the city missionary that there is more people attend the three catholic churches than upon all the protestant churches in the city  catholocism is gaining ground very fast in this city the know nothing5 performance did more hurt than good here as far as that is concerned I should like to know if you have heard from Hellen6 this summer  I have not heard from her since March  I dont know whether they have gone father west or not  I wish that she would write to me but I dont supose she will  I hope that you will not work to hard I want to come home very much and think I shall next fall if nothing happens  I have had my ears pierced and have go me some pretty cameos  they cost two dollers  well I dont want to bother you with what I have got or done but I want to hear so much about your  
 

  1Arvilla Galusha 
  2Mother – Polly Larabee b: 4 Feb 1797, Weathersfield, VT d: 8 Dec 1874, VT; married 1825: William Galusha  
     b: 1796, VT; occupation: minister. 
  3Lowell, Massachusetts. 
  4Irish Catholic immigrants. 
  5Know Nothing or American Party. 
  6Sister – Helen Galusha

business as you can afford to write  well the merimac company7 are building another great mill and then we shall need some more boarding houses but I hope I shall not be here then for I am about sick of working in the mills  well I must stop for I am going to meeting to night so good by till I write again  give my love to Maryett and Mrs L and tell them I thank them for their kindness to you and me  give my love to Lealy8 and tell him to write me

 Arvill Galusha

[on cover] 
Polly Galusha 
Berkshire, VT 

 

  7Merrimack Manufacturing Company. 
  8Brother – Aaron Leland Galusha b: 14 Sep 1832, VT; married: Sarah Armstrong.

 

E.C. Toner, March 9, 1862

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 160

  WRITTEN BY E.C. TONER 
TO HER FRIEND AMY MELENDA GALUSHA1



 

[Lowell]2 March 9 1862 

Friend Amy,

           I send this letter as a mission of interested benevolence knowing that your curiosity would be very much exerted if you should chance to hear that the renowned Artemis Ward had delivered a Lecter to the greedy soles of Lowell:  Well, Amy I paid ...of a dollar and passed in to see the Elephant: and hear him speak. I have not yet fully convinced myself whither I am out a quarter, and not got my moneys worth or not . be it as it will I dont feel particularly over... with Artemis remarks this delightful morning. perhaps the effulgent rays of the March sun somewhat oblitirated the brightness of the son borned of woman. But it dont make an artom difference,

          I do not deem my promise negated to give you the Lecter in full for it has the greatest mass of nothingness that I ever knew myself to sit and listen to patiently for a whole hour in my life.  he didnt stick to one point while a body was getting ready to hear it.  but after all Artemis is no fool. but I should say he was rather a conceited fop with light brown hair and a large Moustache coulerd small in size about as large as any small man: His subject was the Children in the Wood he said he had thought some time what subject would interest the public most, and he thought as the Children in the Wood were pore Children people might like to hear about them.  but Artemis I found was fond of .... this for instance, uncle Ben climed up a tree and uncle John climed after him: I call such outbursts of eloquence his variations. he did deal jointly with Floyd the Traitor. he said the first thing he ever was known to steal was his granmothers knitting needles and sold them for old steel.  but his pilfering  propensities didnt stop there. so he takes him to Washington and has him steel every thing there that he could get his hands on and said he would have taken Buchanans character if he had had one to lose.  Mr South had no Pillow to lie there head upon, nor money nor Pride.  now comes the courtship of Mahitaable Baxter and John W. Jones.  the scene was another house in the wood, with a large fire place with a bright fire  Mahitable sits in one corner John in the other.  John hitched them Mahitable hitched them then they both hitched them they both hitched again and kept hitching till they couldnt get any hitches and so the courtship ended once more ... of his ... and I condemn him to the ... past.  he thinks the hight of earthly happiness is to wear white pants and hold an infant while it is eating molases candy.  he looks to me as tho, that was about as much happiness as he is capable of appreciating.  But for sure he knows one thing and that is how to get money.  So joy and peace be with him I cant.  Farwell not my only appreciated Artemis,  only you grow and thrive in ..., and not wast poor persons  
time laughing at ones own jokes.

             Now Amy I really hope that you will deem it your privelege to appreciate Artemis as he deserves and not be anfluenced by my rather detrimental remarks concerning the young adventurer?

             Spring has arrived and winter with its icy fetters is beginning to give way to its genial smiles next comes April with its smiles and tears. That Month with its variations puts me in mind of the condemed Artemis, then comes balmy May and Rosy June follows quickly in its footsteps with its singing birds and blossoming flowers its springing grass its bubbling Brooks. Oh? this is indeed a beautiful time. My month of all the year, next I love October with its warling winds its foot prints of ...,reminding us that we too must pass away. I like to wander far away from the scenes of busy life in the mellon[melon] tinted Indian summer days and comtemplate upon the past with its bright and veried rays presenting the minds eye.  Childhood is happy Girlhood is blissful Womanhood? must I say it is miserable:all owing to an ill spent life. I presume. well never mind? What cant be cured must be endured.“As the twig is bent, so is the tree inclined.

             Well?  Old Lowell still stands upon the earth.  The mighty eruption of ... the  thundering of cannons nor the booming of shell has not as yet disturbed its equilibrium. I dont think any thing would but the rise or fall King Cotton?  presume you have heard that is reign affects this City of Spindles not a little.

             This house: and its inmates are still in existence.  one of our number has departed this shore and is gliding adown the blissful river of Matrimony.  peace and a lot of Babies to Lizzy Longs and John Lakings ashes.  she that was Ann Eliza Price died with consumption about three months ago.  That tribe that took up there quarters in the lower font asscended into the atic. couldnt stand the pressure of four in a small room and closed windows.  Granny Shaw wont have them up nights prefers her own [s----k] to the fresh breeze of heaven, My anxiety is increasing daily:  I am afraid this war raging out west will exterminate, then farwell to my hopes of ever meeting Ike Lortte or A... Sonvig.  I suppose they will be scalped or put to an end in some diabolical manner: Alas: I believe Amy that you owe me a letter:  but nothing daunted at your neglect I push forward like the dead Artemis and write you because I feel like it. The story is now that we will not have work longer than May. I think I shall advise Hinkley to send on for a quantity of the contrubands3 and see if we cant improve the race by running them through:  Lucy and Carrie still in room with me.  and send there love.  Mrs McIntosh has not been very well for the past two weeks but she is some better  I want you to write me and tell me all about your grand times, please excuse this combination of all sorts. and believe me when I say I have done my best.

 1 Amy Melenda Galusha b: 16 Apr 1825, Berkshire, VT d: 9 Oct 1869, Berkshire, VT. 
 2 Lowell, Massachuisetts.

3 A reference to slaves captured after Union victories who were considered to be contraband until the  
    end of the war clarified their status. 

 

                                                                               Truly E C Toner

[on cover] 
Amy Galusha  
Berkshire, VT

Arvilla Galusha, May 19, 1865

LOWELL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
GALUSHA FAMILY COLLECTION 
LETTER 158

WRITTEN BY DAUGHTER 
TO HER MOTHER POLLY GALUSHA1

[Lowell]2 May 19 [1865]

My Dear Mother

I have just recd your letter and hasten to reply  I am at work in No 1 mill an board at Mrs Sawyers 110 Prince etc  I did board at No 9 dutton street on the Merrimack corp but they had mostly Irish so my room mate and I picked up out dudds and came over here because there are more Americans  What makes you pay any attention to what Geo. says you know he will lie like the devil about me if I dont do as he says  but he can lie all he pleases, now I shall never have any more to do with him that is sure,  you asked me what  
makde me leave Wanooski.3  I will tell you  the work was too hard in the first place and the next place, while I was at home last fall Seymore Galusha came there and told all of that nasty stinking Thompson scrape to Mrs Deal  Ellen and Emma  but I did not know it till Emma got mad at me for something some little trouble and told it all over;  I went into the mill the next morning and gave my notice  I got your letter there and you talked of going to Sutton4 so I did not answer it for I did not know where I should go whether I should go home or go to Lawrence5 where Pauline is  but when my notice was up I settled up my affairs and thought I would go home  I happened to get hold of a Boston Journal and I read in it that the mills were starting up so I made my tracks for here  I started from there friday night and got here Saturday morning about 9 oclock  I went right to the mill got a place the first time asking  My Sewing Machine I did not take  I paid him for the use of it and he paid me back the rest that I had paid for it  I had some money left when I  
got here and what Sarah clark lent me, I put in the penny bank so I could have a little in time of need,  if I could have brought it with me I should but I can get one cheaper and better here this spring for I have been looking around for one, you ask me what trouble I have had with Geo. not a mite more than I ever had only he has not forgot to lie and I came to the conclusion it was not best to have nay more to do with him, I sent to him for some money last sumer and he woudl not send it to me, but I shall never ask him for any more, I was in a very bad pinch last summer but that I got out of at last but I hardly knew one aprill which way to turn myself  it was then I needed help if I ever did in my life but that is past  I hope I shall never get pinched so again, I shall send Leal6 the money just as 
soon as I can earn it  I shall not break into that I have in the bank, I did have a long letter from Sarah7 it was full of slang and nothing else and I shall send it to Leal and tell him that I want no more such

[on cover] 
Polly Galusha 
Berkshire,VT 
  

 

  1Mother – Polly Larabee b: 4 Feb 1797, Weathersfield, VT d: 8 Dec 1874, VT; married 1825:  
    William Galusha b: 1796, VT; occupation: minister. 
  2Lowell, Massachusetts. 
  3Winsooki, Vermont. 
  4Sutton, Quebec, Canada. 
  5Lawrence, Massachusetts. 
  6Brother – Aaron Leland Galusha b: 14 Sep 1832, VT; married: Sarah Armstrong.

  7Sister-in-law – Sarah Armstrong.